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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 16-23

How far we are from achieving universal health coverage? A situational analysis and way forward for India


1 Senior Resident, Centre for Community Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
2 Junior Resident, Centre for Community Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
3 Assistant Professor, Department of Family Medicine and Community Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Jodhpur, India
4 Public health Specialist and Trainer (Saudi Board of Community Medicine), Ministry of Health, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Rama Shankar Rath
Senior Resident, Centre for Community Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi-29
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2395-2113.251342

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Introduction: Universal Health coverage (UHC) is required for fulfilment of Health for All. Currently World Health Organization has proposed indicators for tracing coverage of UHC. This study aimed to find the current status of the UHC in India and Indian States. Material and Methods: Data were collected from the national data portals, national surveys and annual reports of ministry. In case of non-availability, numerator and denominator were used from different sources. Data were entered in to Microsoft excel and analysed using Stata-12. Results: Coverage indicators for Non Communicable diseases and cataract surgery were not available in any national survey or national report of ministry. Coverage of none of the health system indicators were found to be 100%. Few indicators like Skilled attendance at birth, TB cure rate, Preventive chemotherapy against filariasis, access to improved water source had a coverage of 80%. Across the states and union territories the coverage was variable but no significant difference was observed between the EAG and Non EAG states. Very few states have achieved the minimum coverage of 80% in various coverage indicators. Conclusion: There is non-availability of some data and some data were collected in duplication. Because of the lack of data, it is not yet possible to compare the UHC service coverage index across key dimensions of inequality. Until these data gaps are overcome, inequalities in service coverage cannot be assessed.


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