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SHORT COMMUNICATION
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 66-67

Understanding the trends of public spending on health sector: World Health Organization


1 Member of the Medical Education Unit and Institute Research Council, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Submission23-Feb-2019
Date of Acceptance02-Apr-2020
Date of Web Publication5-Jun-2020

Correspondence Address:
Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth (SBV) – Deemed to be University, Tiruporur - Guduvancherry Main Road, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu - 603 108
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/IJCFM.IJCFM_15_19

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  Abstract 


Since the global leaders have adopted the Sustainable Development Goals, major steps have been taken by different nations to attain the goal of universal health coverage. Apart from the various measures which have been tried upon, due emphasis has been given to augment the financial allocation to the health sector and thus expand the reach of health care services. The findings of a recently released report have indicated a hike in the total health spending both in low- & middle-income nations and high-income nations. In the nutshell, it was reported that in excess of 50% and 35% expenditure on health has been through government sector and through out of pocket expenditure respectively. In conclusion, there is an immense need for an augmentation in the government spending on the health sector to minimize the health inequalities and the strengthening of the primary health care.

Keywords: Health, Out-of-pocket expenditure, World Health Organization


How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Understanding the trends of public spending on health sector: World Health Organization. Indian J Community Fam Med 2020;6:66-7

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Understanding the trends of public spending on health sector: World Health Organization. Indian J Community Fam Med [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Sep 25];6:66-7. Available from: http://www.ijcfm.org/text.asp?2020/6/1/66/286017




  Introduction Top


Since the global leaders have adopted the sustainable development goals, major steps have been taken by different nations to attain the goal of universal health coverage.[1] Apart from the various measures which have been tried upon, due emphasis has been given to augment the financial allocation to the health sector and thus expand the reach of health-care services.[2] In-fact, it will not be wrong to say that the performance in the health sector has been linked with the financial growth and demographic changes in any nation.[2] Simultaneously, a significant shortage in the trained health workforce and thus a rise in the demand for employment in the health sector have been reported.[1],[2]


  Pattern of Health Expenditure Top


In general, health expenditure in any nation comes through government, out-of-pocket expenditure, health insurance, and through nongovernmental agencies.[2],[3] The findings of a recently released report have indicated a hike in the total health spending both in low- and middle-income nations and high-income nations.[2] In the nutshell, it was reported that in excess of 50% and 35% expenditure on health has been through government sector and through out-of-pocket expenditure, respectively.[2] The proportion of out-of-pocket expenditure has been an alarming figure and on the global front more than 100 million each year is being pushed into extreme poverty.[2-4]


  Need of the Hour Top


It is high time for the policy makers to understand that an increase in the extent of domestic spending will be a crucial aspect for the attainment of the universal health coverage.[1] At the same time, the government should not look this expenditure in the health sector as a cost, but in reality, it is an investment to minimize poverty and increase the job opportunities and productivity of a nation, which altogether plays an indispensable role in the development of a healthy and safe society.[1-3] Even though, it remains a known fact that public spending on health sector is the key to attain universal health coverage, no such positive trend has been observed.[1],[2] In-fact, the proportion of public spending on health has been quite less in low-income nations when compared with the high-income nations.[2]

Considering the fact that the quality of the primary health care offered is a crucial indicator of the health-care delivery system of any nation, it has been observed that in excess of 50% of health care spending has been assigned for the strengthening of the primary health care in developing nations.[2] In terms of the financial investment from external agencies, it has significantly reduced and is now predominantly in the field of prevention and control of HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis and for the smooth running and expansion of immunization services.[2] However, for a better improvement in the quality of care delivered, there is a simultaneous need to prioritize the availability of comprehensive and correct data.[2]


  Conclusion Top


In conclusion, there is an immense need for an augmentation in the government spending on the health sector to minimize the health inequalities and the strengthening of the primary health care. In addition, it is the responsibility of all the stakeholders, including the citizens to play their part in the strengthening of the health systems.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. Strengthening the health workforce to move forward towards universal health coverage and accomplish the 2030 goals. Ann Trop Med Public Health 2016;9:305-6.  Back to cited text no. 1
  [Full text]  
2.
Xu K, Soucat A, Kutzin J, Brindley C, Maele NV, Toure H, et al. Public Spending on Health: A Closer Look at Global Trends. Geneva: WHO press; 2018. p. 1-16.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. A cross-sectional study to assess the out-of-pocket expenditure of families on the health care of children younger than 5 years in a rural area. Fam Med Com Health 2018;6:124-30.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Ku YC, Chou YJ, Lee MC, Pu C. Effects of national health insurance on household out-of-pocket expenditure structure. Soc Sci Med 2019;222:1-10.  Back to cited text no. 4
    




 

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Abstract
Introduction
Pattern of Healt...
Need of the Hour
Conclusion
References

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